Courses

Penn Health-Tech has curated the recommended curricula for all Penn students interested in medical device innovation. The following course list provides a broad overview of the available courses to bolster your knowledge base in medical device and health technology innovation. If you are a Penn faculty or student and have a class suggestion, email us.


ARCH 725: Design Thinking

Creating new product concepts was once a specialized pursuit exclusively performed by design professionals in isolation from the rest of an organization. Today’s products are developed in a holistic process involving a collaboration amont many disciplines. Design thinking – incorporating processes, approaches, and working methods from traditional designers’ toolkits – has become a way of generating innovative ideas to challenging problems and refining those ideas. Rapid prototyping techniques, affordable and accessible prototyping platforms, and an iterative mindset have enabled people to more reliably translate those ideas into implementable solutions. In this course, students will be exposed to these techniques and learn how to engage in a human-centered design process. Also Offered As: IPD 572

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ARCH 732: Technology Designated Elective

Several sections are offered from which students make a selection. This year’s selections include: Deployable Structures, Performance and Design, Detailed Design Studies, Daylighting, Principles of Digi/Fab, Matter and Energy, Material and Structural Intelligence.

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ARCH 733: Building Product Design

As Craig Vogel notes in The Design of Things to Come, “we are in a new economic age that is in need of a new renaissance in product development, one that leverages multiple minds working in concert.” With this mindset, this interdisciplinary workshop guides students through the product design process from design brief to concept generation and prototype development in one semester, working firsthand with Transwall, a leading manufacturer of demountable wall systems, to focus on a specific product need. The design opportunity looks for the next generation of pre-manufactured wall systems; getting away from field construction walls and looking at critical issues of mass-produced wall systems: flexibility, mobility, structural stability, acoustics, transparency/opacity and operability. During the workshop, students will explore the context that creates the unique need for a new product and have an opportunity to conceptualize their ideas through sketches, digital modeling and prototype development. Also Offered As: IPD 530 Prerequisite: ARCH 403/IPD 503

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ARCH 735: Innovation in Design and Health

Health care is taking on a new role in our society – with a refocusing from episodic care for those who are ill or symptomatic to providing life-long care geared towards maintaining wellness. These changes are evident across numerous areas of design, from wearable technologies that track and analyze, to WELL building initiatives that aim to create healthier environments and improve lives through large scale planning initiatives. A concrete, phiysical representation of this paradigm shift can be found within the hospital building and in the new manner in which hospitals are looking to serve their patients and care for their clinicians. Simultaneously both public and private spaces, hospitals are complex systems in which sickness, health, hospitality, technology, emergency, and community share space and compete for resources. In the development of the new hospital pavilion complex, Penn Medicine, in partnership with HDR, Foster+Partners, and others, has created an integrated project deliver (IPD) system, named PennFIRST. Over the semester, students will work with PennFIRST as their client and focus on the design for key spaces within the new pavilion complex. Through didactic content, active design projects, and a systems level approach, this course will provide students with a strong foundation for further work in the area of design for health and wellness.

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BE 502: From Biomedical Science to the Marketplace

This course explores, through own work (this is, own discovery) the transition from fundamental knowledge to its ultimate application in a clinical device or drug. Emphasis is placed upon factors that influence this transition and upon the integrative requirements across many fields necessary to achieve commercial success. Special emphasis is placed upon entrepreneurial strategies, intellectual property, and the FDA process of proving safety and efficacy. Prerequisite: Graduate students or permission of the instructor

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CIS 350: Software Design & Engineering

You know how to write a “program”. But how do you create a software “product” as part of a team, with customers that have expectations of functionality and quality? This course introduces students to various tools (source control, automated build systems, programming environments, test automation, etc.) and processes (design, implementation, testing, and maintenance) that are used by professionals in the field of software engineering. Topics will include: software development lifecycle; agile and test-driven development; source control and continuous integration; requirements analysis; object-oriented design and testability; mobile and/or web application development; software testing; refactoring ; and software quality metrics. Prerequisite: CIS 121

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EAS 545: Engineering Entrepreneurship I

Engineers and scientists create and lead great companies, hiring managers when and where needed to help execute their vision. Designed expressly for students having a keen interest in technological innovation, this course investigates the roles of inventors and founders in successful technology ventures. Through case studies and guest speakers, we introduce the knowledge and skills needed to recognize and seize a high-tech entrepreneurial opportunity – be it a product or service – and then successfully launch a startup or spin-off company. The course studies key areas of intellectual property, its protection and strategic value; opportunity analysis and concept testing; shaping technology driven inventions into customer-driven products; constructing defensible competitive strategies; acquiring resources in the form of capital, people and strategic partners; and the founder’s leadership role in an emerging high-tech company. Throughout the course emphasis is placed on decisions faced by founders, and on the sequential risks and determinants of success in the early growth phase of a technology venture. The course is designed for, but not restricted to, students of engineering and applied science and assumes no prior business education. Also Offered As: IPD 545 Prerequisite: Third or Fourth year or Graduate standing

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EAS 546: Engineering Entrepreneurship II

This course is the sequel to EAS 545 and focuses on the planning process for a new technology venture. Like its prerequisite, the course is designed expressly for students of engineering and applied science having a keen interest in technological innovation. Whereas EAS 545 investigates the sequential stages of engineering entrepreneurship from the initial idea through the early growth phase of a startup company, EAS 546 provides hands-on experience in developing a business plan for such a venture. Working in teams, students prepare and present a comprehensive business plan for a high-tech opportunity. The course expands on topics from EAS 545 with more in-depth attention to: industry and marketplace analysis; competitive strategies related to high-tech product/service positioning, marketing, development and operations; and preparation of sound financial plans. Effective written and verbal presentation skills are emphasized throughout the course. Ultimately, each team presents its plan to a distinguished panel of recognized entrepreneurs, investors and advisors from the high-tech industry. Prerequisite: EAS 545

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EAS 590: Commercializing Information Technology

EAS 590 provides real world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to actually start a high-tech company. We do that by using the Lean LaunchPad framework for Web start-ups. This class is not about how to write a business plan. Instead you will be getting your hands dirty talking to customers, partners, competitors, as you encounter the chaos and uncertainty of how a start-up actually works. EAS 590 provides real world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to actually start a high-tech company. We do that by using the Lean LaunchPad framework for Web start-ups. This class is not about how to write a business plan. Instead you will be getting your hands dirty talking to customers, partners, competitors, as you encounter the chaos and uncertainty of how a start-up actually works.

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FNCE 750: Venture Capital and the Finance of Innovation

This course covers the finance of technological innovation, with a focus on the valuation tools useful in the venture capital industry. These tools include the “venture capital method,” comparables analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, contingent-claims analysis. The primary audience for this course is finance majors interested in careers in venture capital or in R&D-intensive companies in health care or information technology.

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HCMG 853: Management and Strategy in Medical Devices and Technology

Successful medical devices are an amalgamation of creative and innovative thinking, clinical expertise, and engineering know-how that endures intense regulatory and reimbursement scrutiny. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the nuances of the medical device industry. It will cover topics ranging from device design and discovery, regulatory issues, marketing, reimbursement, management, and strategy. Classroom activities will be supplemented with optional tours of hospitals, research and manufacturing facilities, and hands-on demonstrations of devices. Though the course is intended primarily for MBA students, it will be open to medical and engineering students as well as to hospital house staff.

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HCMG 866: E-Health: Business Models and Impact

This course will introduce students to the main components of Health Information Technology (HIT) and how HIT currently effects, and in the future, may change health care operating models. Although it will not prepare students for primary technology management positions, it will help them understand the role of information technology in the success of the delivery system and other important healthcare processes. It will provide a foundation that will prepare them as managers, investors and consultants to rely upon or manage information technology to accomplish delivery system objectives. The course will give special attention to key health care processes, and topics such as the drive for provider quality and cost improvements, the potential ability to leverage clinical data for care improvement and product development, the growth of new information technologies for consumer directed healthcare and telemedicine, the strategies and economics of individual HIT companies and the role of government. The course relies heavily on industry leaders to share their ideas and experiences with students.

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HCMG 867: Health Care Entrepreneurship

The course focuses on the creation, funding, and management of biotechnology and health services enterprises. The course is designed to supplement other offerings in the Health Care Systems and Management Departments for those students with entrepreneurial interest in such ventures, and will focus on special issues surrounding the conceptualization, planning, diligence and capitalization, launch, compensation and management of these ventures. In addition, course offers methods for self-assessment & development of business models and plans, techniques for technology assessment and strategy, develops foundation for capitalization and partnering strategies, and creates a basis for best practices in company launch and plan execution. Students must apply to take this course. Please see the Health Care Management Department for the application.

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IPD 509: Needfinding

Needfinding is an approach that puts people and their needs at the center of product development and business strategy creation. Over 90% of new products introduced into the marketplace fail. A good portion of these failures are due to lack of understanding of end consumers and their needs. To develop truly successful new products, it’s not enough just to ask people what they need or want. Designers and engineers need tools and techniques to get beyond what people can explicitly state and determine their implicit needs. Needfinding is an approach for developing deep insights that provide strategic direction for corporations and open up new possibilities for product development. In this class students will gain a toolset from which to develop their own approaches to conducting researching for design: learning how to think about other people, about culture, and about new perspectives. They will also learn tactical skills: how to define research questions, how to conduct observations and interviews, how to interpret results, how to synthesize them into fodder for design, and how to communicate their findings in a way that is compelling and actionable for designers, marketers, and business strategists. This class is designed for graduate students and upper level undergrads with a specific interest in product design or design thinking.

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IPD 515: Product Design

This course provides tools and methods for creating new products. The course is intended for students with a strong career interest in new product development , entrepreneurship, and/or technology development. The course follows an overall product design methodology, including the identification of customer needs, generation of product concepts, prototyping, and design-for-manufacturing. Weekly student assignments are focused on the design of a new product and culminate in the creation of a prototype, which is launched at an end-of-semester public Design Fair. The course project is a physical good – but most of the tools and methods apply to services and software products.

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IPD 525: Ergonomics & Human Factors Based Product Design

Human Factors and Ergonomics knowledge is a critical component of a product designer or design engineer’s toolbox. This course teaches the direct application of existing human factors/ergonomic data to the creation of new product designs. Applying human factors knowledge to problem solving for product design happens throughout the design process. It is a useful input as initial ideas begin to ut and as a way to verify completed concepts through directly documented user testing and design iteration. The course would be a mini-lecture/studio style course in which the students will work in class on assigned projects, finding, analyzing, extrapolating and applying data to design solutions and creating mockups, modeland prototypes for user testing of their designs.

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MGMT 241: Knowledge for Social Impact: Analyzing Current Issues & Approaches

Recent technological changes have raised awareness of the magnitude and devastating long-term effects of poverty, food insecurity, limited and unequal access to education, and other social issues. Coupled with growing awareness of these issues is the emerging sense that traditional government programs and charities may be unable to solve these problems – at least, not alone. What may be needed are new strategies – strategies borne of (a) a deep understanding of the issues; (b) interdisciplinary collaboration; and (c) access to business knowledge, frameworks, and resources. This course is designed to provide the information, strategies, examples, and analytical mindset to make students more rigorous, insightful, and effective in analyzing social ills and crafting potential solutions. Together, a cross-disciplinary group of undergraduate students, including students in Wharton, the College, and other Penn Schools, will examine the nature and extent of two pressing social problems – food insecurity and barriers to post-secondary education – and current approaches to solving these problems.

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MGMT 712: Managing strategic partnerships

This course explores the management of strategic partnerships between firms, which have surged in recent years in response to globalization, technological evolution, deregulation, shortened product life cycles, and intensified competition. Today’s alliances drive corporate growth and change, and vary greatly in terms of partner type, commitment, equity investment, degree of control, between scale, and scope. They range from bilateral arrangements to ecosystems to outsourcing, often blurring traditional organizational boundaries and leading to the creation of globally distributed enterprises. In view of these contemporary developments, the objectives of the course are two-fold: (1) to arm you with a set of tools to facilitate the selection of an appropriate alliance strategy in a given situation; and, (2) to provide you with frameworks to help the initiate and implement different kinds of partnerships. The emphasis lies on strategic and organizational aspects in the formation and management of these transactions, rather than financial considerations. Alternative growth strategies to strategic alliances (e.g., acquisitions), the impact of these partnerships on competition within an industry, and regulatory constraints will also be discussed. In terms of its pedagogical approach, this is designed to be an interactive, applied, case-based course with accompanying conceptual readings to help structure your thinking. Given the nature of the course, we will also apply the lessons from the cases to understand the challenges and implications of relevant recent and on-going deals. In addition, guest speakers with experience in investment banking, consulting, and industry will be invited to share their perspectives. A group project is intended to give you the opportunity to apply your learning from the course to a context that is most interesting and relevant to you. Prerequisite: MGMT 611 or MGMT 612

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MGMT 729: Intel Property Strategy

Announcing the first iPhone at Macworld 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs famously boasted: “And boy, have we patented it!” How, and to what extent, do patents and intellectual property really provide competitive advantage for innovative technology companies? What makes an IP asset strategically powerful? How do patents impact, and even drive, major corporate decisions including M&A, venture funding and exits, and entry into new markets? In this course, students will learn to critically analyze and answer these questions, gaining insights they can leverage in their future roles as innovation industry executives, entrepreneurs, strategist and investors. This course is cross-listed with LGST 729/MGMT229. The course includes three major units. In Unit 1, Patents and Innovation Value, we examine closely the relationship between competitive advantage, value proposition, and intellectual property (particularly patents). We will apply our understanding of that relationship to critique and sharpen patent strategy to protect examples of cutting-edge technologies. In Unit 2, Patent Leverage and the Corporate Playbook, we study theory and examples of how intellectual property leverage strategically informs corporate transactions and decisions, for established companies as well as for start-ups. In unit 3, Limits and Alternatives to Patents, we confront the recent legal trend toward reigning in the power and scope of patents. We also consider the growing importance of data as a proprietary technology asset, and discuss options for adapting intellectual property strategy appropriately. Throughout, students will learn and practice applying the concepts we learn to decision-making in examples based on innovative real-world technologies and businesses.

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MGMT 731: Technology Strategy

The course is designed to meet the needs of future managers, entrepreneurs, consultants and investors who must analyze and develop business strategies in technology-based industries. The emphasis is on learning conceptual models and frameworks to help navigate the complexity and dynamism in such industries. This is not a course in new product development or in using information technology to improve business processes and offerings. We will take a perspective of both established and emerging firms competing through technological innovations, and study the key strategic drivers of value creation and appropriation in the context of business ecosystems. The course uses a combination of cases, simulation and readings. The cases are drawn primarily from technology-based industries. Note, however, that the case disucssions are mainly based on strategic (not technical) issues. Hence, a technical background is not required for fruitful participation.

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MGMT 765: Venture Capital and Entrepreneurial Management: Practices and Institutions of Silicon Valley

This elective half-semester course will highlight venture capital and entrepreneurship in general and will explore selected aspects of this industry, including: industry trends and dynamics in Silicon Valley and the South of Market area (SOMA) of San Francisco; the recent emergence of alternative sources of startup financing, including incubators/accelerators and crowdfunding platforms, angel groups and stage-agnostic institutional investors; business and operational aspects of early stage companies in transition to mezzanine-level stages of growth; and company “exits,” including both initial public offerings and merger/sale transactions. MGMT765 and MGMT804 cover separate issues within the same general industry and are not redundant. This course addresses issues faced by later stage VC backed firms, while MGMT804 centers on early stage, pre-revenue startups. The format of this course relies heavily on site visits and recognized leaders within the Bay Area to bring forth on-the-ground perspectives of a changing and important industry. While MGMT804 is not a prerequisite, the two courses are complementary. Prerequisite: MGMT 801 recommended

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MGMT 801: Entrepreneurship

MGMT 801 is the foundation coures in the Entrepeurial Management program. The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and growth. While most of the examples in class will be drawn from new venture formation, the principles also apply to entrepreneurship in corporate settings and to non-profit entrepreneurship. We will be concerned with content and process questions as well as with formulation and implementation issues that relate to conceptualizing, developing, and managing successful new ventures. The emphasis in this course is on applying and synthesizing concepts and techniques from functional areas of strategic management, finance, accounting, managerial economics, marketing, operations management, and organizational behavior in the context of new venture development. The class serves as both a stand alone class and as a preparatory course to those interested in writing and venture implementation (the subject of the semester-long course, MGMT 806). Format: Lectures and case discussions Prerequisites: Wharton MBA students only.

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MGMT 802: Change, Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Designed for students with a serious interest in entrepreneurship, this course will provide you with an advanced theoretical foundation and a set of practicaltools for the management of startups and entrepreneurial teams in fast-changing and innovative environments. Building on the skills of MGMT 801, every class session is built around an experience where you have to put learning into practice, including the award-winning Looking Glass entrepreneurial simulation, role-playing exercises, and a variety of other games and simulations. The goal is to constantly challenge you to deal with entrepreneurial or innovative experiences, as you learn to navigate complex and changing environments on the fly, applying what you learned to a variety of scenarios. MGMT 802 is built to be challenging and will require a desire to deal with ambiguous and shifting circumstances. Format: Lectures, discussion, interim reports, class participation, readings report, and presentations, and an innovation assessment in PowerPoint format. Prerequisites: MGMT 801 strongly recommended.

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MGMT 892: Collaborative Innovation Program

Corporate partners propose a current business challenge they’re trying to address, and the Mack Institute facilitates student teams to work on the challenge. Guided by Wharton faculty, students selected for the program may provide the following: industry analysis, competitor analysis, general environment analysis (trends and uncertainties including political, technological, global, and sociocultural segments), and assessment of the organization’s internal strengths and weaknesses. Specific analysis will depend on the corporate partner’s objectives for the project.

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MKTG 721: New Product Management

This course provides a total immersion in the new product development process – from sourcing ideas and innovation, through new product sales forecasting. The focus is on collective learning, what works, what doesn’t, and why. While the primary focus is the new product development process within a corporate structure, some coverage is given to key issues surrounding start-ups. Also offered as MKTG 221. Prerequisite: MKTG 611

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MKTG 734: Idea Generation and the Systematic Approach for Creativity

The ability to solve problems creatively and generate change is a recognized standard of success and plays an important role in gaining a competitive advantage in many areas of business management. This course is designed to teach students several creative problem solving methodologies that complement other managerial tools acquired in undergraduate and graduate studies. The course offers students the opportunity to learn how to solve problems, identify opportunities, and generate those elusive ideas that potentially generate enormous benefits to organizations. The objectives of this course are to enhance the students’ (a) creativity, (b) ability to innovate and (c) ability to identify, recruit, develop, manage, retain, and collaborate with creative people. The course includes: 1. A review of the literature on creativity, creative people, innovation, and design as well as the leadership and management of creative people and innovation. 2. Hands on learning of approaches for generating creative ideas. Students will have the opportunity of implementing the techniques studied in class. 3. Applications of creativity to selected management domains – Approaches to the generation of creative options are not limited to the development of products and services or businesses, but can be applied to all areas of management, business, and life. The purpose of these sessions is to explore the applications of creative approaches to marketing, advertising, organizational design, negotiations, and other management challenges. 4. Integration – Both via individual assignments and a group project in which interdisciplinary teams of students generate a creative product/service/customer

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MTR 620: Commercializing Translational Therapeutics

This course provides an in-depth view of the process by which scientific discoveries are commercialized. This course covers discovery in the laboratory, technology transfer, regulatory, financial, and managerial issues involved in moving a technology from the lab into the market place. The course contents fall into three broad categories: (1) examples of scientific discoveries that have been commercialized, (2) fundamental elements of technology transfer, such as intellectual property protection and licensing, and (3) aspects of commercialization, such as regulatory approval, financing, and startup formation. In using this structure, the course provides parallel coverage of both the science and the commercialization process, in such a way that the elements of one contribute to the student’s experience in learning the other.

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